Treatment Approaches

Mental health belmont

The clinicians at PHaWS are continually updating and refining their skills. We stay abreast of the current research and offer treatments that have been proven to be helpful.

During your assessment the clinician will discuss with you the types of approaches that could be helpful for your concerns; enabling you to make a decision about the approach you would like to take. Information below is in relation to some of the treatment approaches we offer. They will always be evidenced based. The Information below has been sourced from a selection of websites, including

www.beyondblue.org.au

www.emdraa.org

www.nice.org.uk

www.nedc.com.au

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

CBT has been assessed as being one of the best treatments for depression, anxiety disorders and eating disorders, and when used in conjunction with hypnosis is also the best psychological treatment for people wanting to lose weight. It is also one of the two main talking therapies recommended for people who have both a long term physical health condition such as heart disease, diabetes and chronic pain and for conditions described as medically unexplained such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome where the person is also experiencing depression and /or anxiety.

In CBT clients will look at patterns of thinking (cognition) and acting (behaviour) that are more likely to make then have problems with depression. Once these thinking patterns and consequential behaviours are recognised, then the person can make changes to shift the negative or unhelpful thought patterns and reactions to more realistic, positive and problem solving approach.

The great news is that CBT is highly recommended and does not have any side effects. It can be offered individually or within a group with other people having similar experiences. The number of sessions varies between 4 and 24 weekly depending on the diagnosis and the severity or the symptoms and the willingness of the person to ‘practice’ their new skills outside of the session.

During your assessment the clinician will discuss with you the types of approaches that could be helpful for your concerns; enabling you to make a decision about the approach you would like to take. Information below is in relation to some of the treatment approaches we offer. They will always be evidenced based. The Information below has been sourced from a selection of websites, including

www.beyondblue.org.au

www.emdraa.org

www.nice.org.uk

www.nedc.com.au

ITP is based on the idea that personal relationships are a significant contributory factor in the development and maintenance of depression. It is different to other therapies because it focuses on personal relationships and on building skills to deal with these problems than thoughts and feelings. This may include grief over lost relationships, differing expectations within relationships and patterns in relationships that make them vulnerable to depression.

IPT has been found to be helpful across all age groups, including women with post-natal depression and although length of treatment varies is usually conducted over four to 24 weekly sessions.

People with depression derive a diminished sense of pleasure and achievement from life. The problem is that when depression leads to inactivity, withdrawal and isolation, there are even fewer opportunities to derive pleasure or a sense of achievement from life. As a consequence, depression, hopelessness, lethargy and motivation worsen over time. At this point, the “vicious cycle of depression” is in full swing.

The aim of Behavioural Therapy is to reverse the cycle of depression by focusing exclusively on increasing people’s levels of activity and pleasure in their life. BA can be carried out in groups or with individuals , and generally lasts eight to 16 weeks.

 

Combining ancient wisdom and 21st century science, Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is proving to be a powerful tool to help prevent relapse in depression and the after effects of trauma. MBCT is also being found to be helpful for people who are currently depressed.

MBCT uses meditation to initially focus on physical sensations, but later it is used to focus on thoughts and feelings. This helps people understand what their experience of depression is. It helps people to discover what makes them vulnerable to downward mood spirals, and why they get stuck at the bottom of the spiral. It helps people see the connection between downward spirals, and:

  • The high standards that oppress us
  • The feelings that we are simply “not good enough”
  • The ways we put pressure on ourselves or make ourselves miserable with overwork
  • The ways we lose touch with what makes life worth living.

It is often delivered in ‘classes’ or groups over 8 weekly sessions with the learning completed in the class and the application or practice being completed in between classes.

 
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

CBT has been assessed as being one of the best treatments for people with anxiety disorders, depression and eating disorders, and when used in conjunction with hypnosis is also the best psychological treatment for people wanting to lose weight. It is also one of the two main talking therapies recommended for people who have both a long term physical health condition such as heart disease, diabetes and chronic pain and for conditions described as medically unexplained such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome or Chronic fatigue Syndrome where the person is also experiencing depression and /or anxiety.

In CBT clients will look at patterns of thinking (cognition) and acting (behaviour) that are more likely to make then have problems with depression. Once these thinking patterns and consequential behaviours are recognised, then the person can make changes to shift the negative or unhelpful thought patterns and reactions to more realistic, positive and problem solving approach.

The great news is that CBT is highly recommended and does not have any side effects. It can be offered individually or within a group with other people having similar experiences. The number of sessions varies between 4 and 24 weekly depending on the diagnosis and the severity or the symptoms and the willingness of the person to ‘practice’ their new skills outside of the session.

 

Exposure therapy has been assessed as being very helpful for Specific phobias, Obsessional Compulsive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Acute Stress Disorder, Agoraphobia, Panic Disorder and Social Phobia.

There are a number of different approaches to exposure therapy but they are all based on exposing the person to the things that make them anxious. The person will learn that their fear will reduce without the need to avoid or escape the situation and that their fears about the situation often do not come true or are not as bad as they thought.

Confronting fear inducing situations can be distressing and behaviour therapy is best done with the support of a professional. The number of sessions needed varies depending on the type of anxiety disorder and the severity of the symptoms and typically range between four and 20 sessions

 

The mind can often heal itself naturally, in the same way as the body does. Much of this natural coping mechanism occurs during sleep, particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Francine Shapiro developed Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR) in 1987, utilising this natural process in order to successfully treat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Since then, EMDR has been used to effectively treat a wide range of mental health problems including:

  • Anxiety
  • Panic attacks
  • Performance anxiety
  • Phobias
  • Stress reduction
  • Complicated grief
  • Dissociative disorders
  • Pain disorders
  • Body dysmorphic disorders
  • Eating disorders
  • Depression
  • Addictions
  • Disturbing memories

Eye movements, similar to those during REM sleep, will be recreated simply by asking you to watch the therapist’s finger moving backwards and forwards across your visual field.The eye movements will last for a short while and then stop. You will then be asked to report back on the experiences you have had during each of these sets of eye movements. Experiences during a session may include changes in thoughts, images and feelings.

With repeated sets of eye movements, the memory tends to change in such a way that it loses its painful intensity and simply becomes a neutral memory of an event in the past. Other associated memories may also heal at the same time. This linking of related memories can lead to a dramatic and rapid improvement in many aspects of your life.

EMDR can accelerate therapy by resolving the impact of your past traumas and allowing you to live more fully in the present. It is not, however, appropriate for everyone. The process is rapid, and any disturbing experiences, if they occur at all, last for a comparatively short period of time. Nevertheless, you need to be aware of, and willing to experience, the strong feelings and disturbing thoughts, which sometimes occur during sessions.

Further information can be found here Read More

Unfortunately EMDR Is not currently funded via Medicare or Victims of Crime Services. The EMDR Association of Australia are working hard to get EMDR on the approved list of Focussed Psychological Therapies.

When considering treatment approaches if you think that you may have an eating disorder, it is important to understand that different people respond to different types of treatment, even if they are experiencing the same eating disorder.

The evidence-based treatments listed below have been found to be effective for eating disorders and that we are able to offer at PHaWS. Typically, these treatments are not stand-alone treatments and a person with an eating disorder will usually receive a combination of treatments as part of their recovery program. Some treatments are better suited to specific eating disorders than others and a multidisciplinary approach to treatment is often the best way to treat an eating disorder.

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy-Enhanced (CBT-E) is a type of psychotherapy aimed at helping a person to change unhelpful or unhealthy habits of thinking, feeling and behaving and to learn practical self-help strategies.

Its treatment approach is beneficial for a range of mental and emotional health issues where disordered eating occurs. It is a combination of two therapies: ‘cognitive therapy’ and ‘behaviour therapy’, based on the premise that thoughts and feelings are inter-dependent.

When it comes to treating eating disorders, CBT-E aims to change the way a person thinks about food and themselves. CBT-E seeks to challenge negative thought patterns, and in the case of eating disorders this may include black and white thinking, magnification of importance of events and errors in attribution, for instance the misunderstanding of the relationship between cause and effect.

The evidence-based treatments listed below have been found to be effective for eating disorders and that we are able to offer at PHaWS. Typically, these treatments are not stand-alone treatments and a person with an eating disorder will usually receive a combination of treatments as part of their recovery program. Some treatments are better suited to specific eating disorders than others and a multidisciplinary approach to treatment is often the best way to treat an eating disorder.

Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT) is a modified form of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT). Based on an emotion regulation model, its aim is to help people manage, process and regulate negative emotions in a positive, healthy and productive manner.

Its premise, in the case of eating disorders, is that these are born as a coping mechanism to deal with emotional distress when no other form of coping strategy is available.

Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT) is a modified form of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT). Based on an emotion regulation model, its aim is to help people manage, process and regulate negative emotions in a positive, healthy and productive manner.

Its premise, in the case of eating disorders, is that these are born as a coping mechanism to deal with emotional distress when no other form of coping strategy is available.

Family approaches are most common when adolescents, young adults and children are suffering from an eating disorder.

Family approaches will involve the whole family or support network of the person with the eating disorder during treatment. The aim of a family approach is to treat the person with the eating disorder, while also supporting and educating the entire family about how to provide appropriate care. Focus can also be placed on strengthening family relationships and improving the family dynamic.

The two most common therapies involving the whole family are the Family Based Therapy and the Maudsley Approach.

Nutritional management approaches are provided by a dietitian or nutritionist during treatment. This approach has been designed to ensure that the person with the eating disorder is receiving the right level of vitamins and minerals throughout the treatment process and to help develop normal and beneficial eating habits and behaviours.

 

In addition to the various treatments available for eating disorders, people have also found complementary therapies helpful in their process of treatment and recovery.

Complementary treatments should not be employed without other medical and psychological treatments provided by a clinician and/or a carer and they should not be considered a replacement for other evidence-based treatment approaches. Instead, they should form part of a comprehensive and holistic treatment plan to increase the quality of life of the person with the eating disorder.

 

Acceptance and commitment therapy is a cognitive behavioural treatment with a focus on mindfulness and flexibility of thoughts and feelings. It aims to increase awareness of a person’s experiences and responses to their own environment.

Through acceptance and commitment therapy, a person with an eating disorder can learn to break destructive cycles of negative thoughts.

Mindfulness teaches people to respond to their thoughts without judgment and promotes a state of being in which the person is present in their thoughts, feelings and body. Mindfulness also teaches acceptance and self-compassion, which can be key in combating negative thoughts and feelings.

Mindfulness can be helpful in the treatment of eating disorders, particularly in addressing the feelings of shame and guilt that often accompany an eating disorder. Mindfulness, as an addition to treatment for eating disorders, can also be effective in the development of skills relating to emotional regulation, distress tolerance and personal relationships.

Research indicates that there are strong links between chronic physical illness, anxiety and depression. Research has shown that 28 percent of people living with a chronic physical condition will also have a mental health condition.

People who experience persistent pain are four more times likely to experience anxiety or depression than people living without pain.

Continuing physical illness can also trigger anxiety, complicate the treatment of anxiety or the physical illness itself. Common conditions that can do this are hormonal problems, diabetes, respiratory problems such as asthma or COPD and diabetes.

Depression also increases the likelihood of developing a chronic physical illness, particularly heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

There are many things that people with anxiety or depression and a chronic physical health condition can do to help them recover and stay well. Below are some of the treatments we offer at PHaWS.

CBT has been assessed as being one of the best treatments for depression, anxiety disorders and eating disorders, and when used in conjunction with hypnosis is also the best psychological treatment for people wanting to lose weight. It is also one of the two main talking therapies recommended for people who are experiencing a long term physical health condition such as heart disease, diabetes and chronic pain and for conditions described as medically unexplained such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome or Chronic fatigue Syndrome and where the person is also experiencing depression and /or anxiety.

In CBT clients will look at patterns of thinking (cognition) and acting (behaviour) that are more likely to make then have problems with depression. Once these thinking patterns and consequential behaviours are recognised, then the person can make changes to shift the negative or unhelpful thought patterns and reactions to more realistic, positive and problem solving approach.

The great news is that CBT is highly recommended and does not have any side effects. It can be offered individually or within a group with other people having similar experiences. The number of sessions varies between 4 and 24 weekly depending on the diagnosis and the severity or the symptoms and the willingness of the person to ‘practice’ their new skills outside of the session.

ITP is based on the idea that personal relationships are a significant contributory factor in the development and maintenance of depression. It is different to other therapies because it focuses on personal relationships and on building skills to deal with these problems than thoughts and feelings. This may include grief over lost relationships, differing expectations within relationships and patterns in relationships that make them vulnerable to depression.

IPT has been found to be helpful across all age groups, including women with post-natal depression and although length of treatment varies is usually conducted over four to 24 weekly sessions.

The mind can often heal itself naturally, in the same way as the body does. Much of this natural coping mechanism occurs during sleep, particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Francine Shapiro developed Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR) in 1987, utilising this natural process in order to successfully treat Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Since then, EMDR has been used to effectively treat a wide range of mental health problems including:

  • Pain disorders
  • Anxiety
  • Panic attacks
  • Performance anxiety
  • Phobias
  • Stress reduction
  • Complicated grief
  • Dissociative disorders
  • Body dysmorphic disorders
  • Eating disorders
  • Depression
  • Addictions
  • Disturbing memories

Eye movements, similar to those during REM sleep, will be recreated simply by asking you to watch the therapist’s finger moving backwards and forwards across your visual field. The eye movements will last for a short while and then stop. You will then be asked to report back on the experiences you have had during each of these sets of eye movements. Experiences during a session may include changes in thoughts, images and feelings.

With repeated sets of eye movements, the memory tends to change in such a way that it loses its painful intensity and simply becomes a neutral memory of an event in the past. Other associated memories may also heal at the same time. This linking of related memories can lead to a dramatic and rapid improvement in many aspects of your life.

EMDR can accelerate therapy by resolving the impact of your past traumas and allowing you to live more fully in the present. It is not, however, appropriate for everyone. The process is rapid, and any disturbing experiences, if they occur at all, last for a comparatively short period of time. Nevertheless, you need to be aware of, and willing to experience, the strong feelings and disturbing thoughts, which sometimes occur during sessions.

Further information can be found here Read More

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